Monthly Archives: June 2018

Things To Consider Before Opening A Coffee Shop

So, if you’ve decided on doing your exercise at home, the next question is: What kind of exercise? Once again, it has to be something you enjoy. I firmly believe you should do several different activities. To give you an example, every Saturday ( my day off ) I take a long bike ride. I look forward to it all week. Cycling is my favorite form of exercise but it’s only one day a week and that’s not enough. Monday, Wednesday and Friday, I exercise right in my living room while I’m watching Tv. I drag out the treadmill and do 45 minutes. I also have a set of dumbbells which I use on occasion, usually a couple of times a week. Getting any ideas? Of course you can do things your way. The point is: Get moving!

The culprit isn’t in the amount of experience you have, nor is it due to lack of capital. You will need a lot of knowledge about the coffee business to make it successful enough to stay open for years. If you are going to open a coffee shop, you might as well make it work. It would be a pity not to be able to get your investment back or enjoy the profits for many years.

On the other hand, many of these brief first coffee dates may go on for hours, when two people find a camaraderie and connection that draw them together. This is not different from other meetings with an unknown person or a blind date set up before the internet was established. Such meetings were just as difficult.

Maybe you don’t want all of the heartache and stress that comes with starting a business. Maybe you just want the heartache and stress that comes with buying a business! Whatever your decision is be sure that you are well informed. Hopefully I can give you some direction as to what to look for and what to expect.

Sculptor Bill Burgess founded FrameWorks 34 years ago, then Ron and Julie Burnham owned it for 14 of what Colvin calls the “glory years,” when renowned photographer Myron Wood frequented the business.

Everything would be itemized on a bill pad, and added up the old fashioned way. Or the clerk would enter the price by hitting the manual keys of a cash register. We’d hand over our money and the cash drawer would fly open. Then our change would be counted back. When is the last time something actually counted back your change? These days it’s merely dumped into our waiting hand.

Let’s say the bookstore anticipates selling 7 copies of a book per week, or approximately 1 per day. Some days, 2 copies are sold, but never more than 9 books in any week and never more than 4 books in 3 days. Let’s also say that books can be printed and delivered in 3 days, which is nearly impossible with traditional printing but simple with POD. Then, using the kanban system, when only 4 books are in inventory (the maximum that will be sold between the time of the order and the time of the delivery), the company places an order for another 9 books. This way, just when the inventory has no more books from the previous order, the next order arrives.

Two of these titles are sufficiently interesting that I want to buy them. I pull up the menu on the reader and add them to my shopping cart. When I’m done browsing, I hit the purchase button. According to the displayed information, one of the books is in the store and will be waiting for me at the main counter. The other book isn’t available in the store, but it is in the warehouse. I can get it for a 10% discount. Would I like to buy it and have it mailed directly to me? Sure, I would!